Future-publishing with ABMJasper Spicero in <i>Bonus Material II</i> reviewed(micro)genres of music exploredAn interview with Berlin Community Radio<i>Present Fictions</i> @ DRAF reviewedMetahaven @ Future Gallery reviewedDaniel Temkin’s NetVVorth to your Bitcoin<i>Pre Owned: Looks Good Man</i> @ Cell Project Space reviewed<i>All Possible Futures</i> reviewedThe (Sci-)art of philosophising with Luca Pozzi<i>Surplus Living</i> @ Alte Münze reviewed<i>THE ANGRY SHOW</i> @ 55 Sydenham Rd install photos<i>Fulfilment Centre</i> @ The Sunday Painter reviewedAn interview with Constant DullaartDavid Jablonowski @ Lüttgenmeijer reviewedSome laconic insights care of Xu ZhenHito Steyerl, the ICA + ‘Liquidity Inc.’Concerning <i>Art Post-Internet</i>ASMR obssessions + live YouTube mixing in ‘Browser Windows’An interview with Darja Bajagić

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  • In recent years, publishers and graphic artists have been working together on ebook projects to reach younger audiences or safeguard priceless works. Digitisation, as in the process of transforming printed works into digital ones, is now carried out by most major museums and University publishers. But beyond the realm of academia, commercial publishers and bookstores are struggling when it comes to art books. Supplying readers with electronic versions have had limited success, the appeal of print as bookshelf ornaments or coffee table objects, still apply and, judging by the slim catalogues in major book stores, key players have invested little in the area.
    But Gutenberg’s…

  • With the proliferation of online galleries and netart produced and sold digitally, the recently launched series of Bonus Material PDF publications – initiated by Leipzig-based collective Info-Punkt – takes the idea of ‘printed matter’ away from physical tangibility and the elite status of a collector’s item. Instead, they offer a free and accessible curated selection of images and video clips from exhibitions past. The second issue of Bonus Material, which was published online last month, features previously unreleased documentation of two 2012 solo exhibitions by American artist Jasper Spicero.

    Spicero’s work is an adept amalgamation of the highly technical and the hyper-banal. The images of his…

  • What happens to an internet musical (micro)genre once it falls out of the spotlight? Does it dissipate into a cloud of free-floating data, or perhaps mutate into new, increasingly-ephemeral forms? Genre identification is, primarily, a tool for music writers. It serves as shorthand or a reference point, casting a cohesive net over the chaos of ever-emerging sounds, threading them into genealogies and timelines. The creator or discoverer of a new genre becomes a mage who symbolically turns word into flesh, and their instincts and premonitions into actuality.
    Grouping seemingly disparate artists into a category (even if it requires a certain shoehorning in its initial stages) and…

  • Berlin Community Radio (BCR) is exactly what this city needs: a platform to broadcast the huge assortment of creative output Berlin has been harvesting for years. The independent radio station has been live since September 2013, and I sat down with founders Anastasia Filipovna and Sarah Miles in their Pflügerstraße studio – nestled in the heart of the quickly expanding Neukölln district – to discuss the launch of their latest programme, ‘Welcome to Berlin.’
    Almost immediately, the conversation turned into a brainstorming session, spurred by their joint enthusiasm. The exciting part about BCR is the openness to all kinds of new content that Miles and Filipovna encourage, actively…

  • The title of the David Roberts Art Foundation’s two-day programme Present Fictions is explicitly referring to fictions of the ‘now’ – what the introduction describes as “contemporary approaches to visual culture, poetry, science fiction and narrative structures”. By the time the series is complete, it feels like it could just as well be its homograph: a variety of fictions having been presented, stepped inside of, tested out, and contemplated.
    In fact, the “present” preface is in some ways misleading: the fictions of now tend to look forward, applying imagination to our current technologies and ways of life to fictionalise tomorrow. This is what Cher Potter, senior research fellow in…

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